09/12/21 – Fairy Tales

CURRENT EVENTS

Fairy Tales

BOOK OF THE WEEK

This books says so much in so few words.

How To Be Happy, Dammit

By Karen Salmansohn

Guaranteed to perk up even the most cynical spirit, HOW TO BE HAPPY, DAMMIT is the first and only self-help book that merges psychology, biology, eastern and western philosophies, quantum physics, and the Zen of Bazooka Joe. (Source: Back cover of book)

MOVIES OF THE WEEK

I thought this was an interesting film.

Secondhand Lions (2003)

MUSIC OF THE WEEK

I saw this music video on my friend Samantha’s blog (hearttofollow.wordpress.com)  and wanted to pass it on. For some reason, I’m not able to post a hyper-link to her blog, but I can send it to you via email if you wish.

Symphony

by Sheppard

Sheppard is an Australian indie pop band from Brisbane,

formed in 2009

ART OF THE WEEK

City Hall in Bay City, MI

The original settlers in what now is Bay City arrived in the 1830s. By 1857, fourteen sawmills were located along the Saginaw River, and after the Civil War both lumbering and shipbuilding continued strongly. In 1889, voters approved the construction of a new city hall. In 1892, local architects Leverett A. Pratt and Walter Koeppe were hired to design the structure, and the cornerstone was laid in 1894. The building was completed by the summer of 1897 at a cost of $175,000.

The building was used by the city through the 20th century, with a major renovation in 1975. In 2010, a major re-tiling of the roof was undertaken, but a construction incident caused a large fire. The building was closed for 3 years, and an extensive, $10 million renovation performed. It was reopened in 2013, and still serves the city.

The Bay City Hall is a Richardsonian Romanesque building constructed of Indiana limestone, sandstone, and granite, measuring approximately 120 feet by 200 feet. The multi-gabled roof is tiled, and a large sandstone tower, nearly 180 feet high, is located at the southeast corner. The tower is topped with a gable roof with spires, and contains a large clock with separate dial faces on each of its four sides. The windows in the building are flat-headed units set in round arches, and are divided by heavy stone mullions. The entrance is through a huge double Romanesque arch, decorated with an elaborate stucco bas-relief, and sheltered with an arched porch supported by polished stone columns.

The interior is dominated by a large central stairwell, illuminated by skylights, with an elaborately scrolled cast iron banister.

There are four ornate floors 

With a replica of the Liberty Bell on one of the floors

Carol and I climbed the Clock Tower stairs to the top

Pictures cannot do justice to this magnificent structure. Bay City made a choice, they could have build a new city hall or restore this magnificent building–they choose wisely and restored the building which is still functioning as their city hall.

  EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE  OF THE WEEK

 These two have some funny and astute political commentary.

TYRUS & KAT TIMPT

  JOKE OF THE WEEK

PHYSICAL TRAITS

Potato Chips

Chips are not the healthiest thing to eat,

but at least there aren’t too many in a bag. 

CHARACTER TRAITS 

SOCIAL TRAITS

LEARNING TRAITS

I wish this didn’t seem so true to me.

MISCELLANEOUS

It seems to me that the media likes to divide us and loves to preach fear.

Book

If you have ever been curious about this book, the Kindle version of this book has now been reduced to $1.00 and the paperback version has been reduced to $10.00

 

However, I must warn you that this book will not change your life, 

only you can do that.

My Final Cover

This book can be ordered from Amazon or Barnes & Nobles.

 

 

09/05/21 – Happy Labor Day

CURRENT EVENTS

Happy Labor Day

BOOK OF THE WEEK

Recently, I have watched a number of film versions of this book, so I decided to read the book. It is actually, a fairly easy book to read.

The Great Gatsby

By F. Scott Fitzgerald

I suspect many of you have either read the book or seen a movie version of the book, so you folks may find the following of interest.

A black-and-white photographic portrait of Jazz Age writer F. Scott Fitzgerald.

American socialite and heiress Ginevra King pictured on the July 1918 cover of Town & Country magazine. In January 1915, a 16-year-old King met future novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Love-struck at first sight, Fitzgerald courted King for several years. He visited her father’s estate several times, and Ginevra wrote in her diary that she was “madly in love with him.” However, Ginevra’s upper-class family openly discouraged Fitzgerald’s courtship of their daughter because of his lower-class status, and her father purportedly told him that “poor boys shouldn’t think of marrying rich girls”.

Rejected by Ginevra’s family as a suitor because of his lack of financial prospects, a suicidal Fitzgerald enlisted in the United States Army amid World War I. Ginevra King later served as the inspiration for the character of Daisy Buchanan in Fitzgerald’s literary masterwork The Great Gatsby. (Source: Wikipedia)

Edith Cummings, a premier amateur golfer, inspired the character of Jordan Baker. A friend of Ginevra King, she was one of Chicago’s famous debutantes in the Jazz Age.

 

The now-demolished Beacon Towers partly served as an inspiration for Gatsby’s home.

 

Oheka Castle was another North Shore inspiration for the novel’s setting.

MOVIES OF THE WEEK

In August of this year, I watched all four of these film versions of The Great Gatsby and found it a rewarding experience. Oh hindsight, I wish I had read the book first, rather than last. 

1949 Version

 

1974 Version

 

2000 Version

 

2013 Version

MUSIC OF THE WEEK

The Great Gatsby Charleston Swing Party

by DJ Electro Swingable Mix

ART OF THE WEEK

The Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City. At 1,046 feet, it is the tallest brick building in the world with a steel framework, and was the world’s tallest building for 11 months after its completion in 1930. (Source: Wikipedia)

  EXTRAORDINARY PERSON  OF THE WEEK

F. Scott Fitzgerald

In 1921

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American novelist, essayist, short story and screenwriter. He was best known for his novels depicting the flamboyance and excess of the Jazz Age—a term he popularized.

During his lifetime, he published four novels, four collections of short stories, and 164 short stories. Although he achieved temporary popular success and fortune in the 1920s, Fitzgerald received critical acclaim only after his death, and is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

Born into a middle-class family in St. Paul, Minnesota, Fitzgerald was raised primarily in New York. He attended Princeton University, but owing to a failed relationship with socialite Ginevra King and a preoccupation with writing, he dropped out in 1917 to join the United States Army.

While stationed in Alabama, he romanced Zelda Sayre, a Southern debutante who belonged to Montgomery’s exclusive country-club set. Although she rejected Fitzgerald initially, because of his lack of financial prospects, Zelda agreed to marry him after he published the commercially successful This Side of Paradise (1920). The novel became a cultural sensation and cemented his reputation as one of the eminent writers of the decade.

His second novel, The Beautiful and Damned (1922), propelled him further into the cultural elite. To maintain his affluent lifestyle, he wrote numerous stories for popular magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post, Collier’s Weekly, and Esquire. During this period, Fitzgerald frequented Europe, where he befriended modernist writers and artists of the “Lost Generation” expatriate community, including Ernest Hemingway.

His third novel, The Great Gatsby (1925), received generally favorable reviews but was a commercial failure, selling fewer than 23,000 copies in its first year. Despite its lackluster debut, The Great Gatsby is now widely praised, with some labeling it the “Great American Novel”.

Following the deterioration of his wife’s mental health and her placement in a mental institute for schizophrenia, Fitzgerald completed his final novel, Tender Is the Night (1934).

Struggling financially because of the declining popularity of his works amid the Great Depression, Fitzgerald turned to Hollywood, writing and revising screenplays. While living in Hollywood, he cohabited with columnist Sheilah Graham, his final companion before his death. After a long struggle with alcoholism, he attained sobriety only to die of a heart attack in 1940, at 44.

His friend Edmund Wilson completed and published an unfinished fifth novel, The Last Tycoon (1941), after Fitzgerald’s death.

  JOKE OF THE WEEK

PHYSICAL TRAITS

Tips From World Famous Chef Ronaldo

Here is this week’s tip from Chef Ronaldo

CHARACTER TRAITS 

SOCIAL TRAITS

LEARNING TRAITS

MISCELLANEOUS

Book

If you have ever been curious about this book, the Kindle version of this book has now been reduced to $1.00 and the paperback version has been reduced to $10.00

 

However, I must warn you that this book will not change your life, 

only you can do that.

My Final Cover

This book can be ordered from Amazon or Barnes & Nobles.